50 MARKETING | How to create a meaningful elevator pitch in 4 easy steps. w/Kevin Rogers.

50 MARKETING | How to create a meaningful elevator pitch in 4 easy steps. w/Kevin Rogers.

Kevin Rogers spent years traveling the United States as a dead-broke stand-up comedian, until he discovered how a simple joke formula could be used as a powerful marketing hook and began teaching it to marketers. Today Kevin is an expert copywriter, and one of the most in-demand sales consultants online, working closely with high-volume information marketers, corporations and local brick and mortar businesses alike to turn around sluggish ad campaigns. Find out how you can apply his deceptively simple 4-sentence formula to skyrocket your profits and grow your businesses at record pace!

49 SALES | How to overcome group buying dysfunction and close more sales. w/Garin Hess.

49 SALES | How to overcome group buying dysfunction and close more sales. w/Garin Hess.

Garin Hess, serial SaaS entrepreneur and CEO of Consensus, shares insights on how to prevent group buying dysfunction from killing 50% or more of your sales. Learn how to think about the key players in your buying group that influence the purchase decision, and develop a strategy to dramatically increase your close rates and shorten your sales cycle. 

48 LEADERSHIP | How to achieve peak performance. w/ K. Anders Ericsson.

48 LEADERSHIP | How to achieve peak performance. w/ K. Anders Ericsson.

K. Anders Ericcson, Conradi Eminent Scholar and Professor of Psychology at Florida State University, shares insights from his latest book "Peak: Secrets from the new science of expertise.” which he coauthored with Robert Pool. Find out how lessons learned from decades of research on human performance can help you maximize your effectiveness as a business owner and leader. Anders has spent his career researching how expert performers attain their superior performance through extended deliberate practice. Ericsson’s research has been widely cited and famously mischaracterized by Malcolm Gladwell, who failed to adequately distinguish between the quantity of hours spent practicing, and the quality of that practice when citing the "10,000-Hour Rule” in his New York Times bestseller, "Outliers."